October 6th, 2003

Ceci n'est pas une personne.

(no subject)

I am the kind of idiot they need to design better menus for. Two nights in a row now I have set up Kazaa Lite to down load episodes of Red Dwarf (as in the BBC Sci-Fi/Comedy, not as in midget menstural porn. Are we clear on that? Good.) and two nights in a row I have gone to "Hide" Kazaa and ended up closing it. Why do they put those two items right next to each other on the menu? I think the program designers are sitting there laughing at me. Probably redirecting my downloads to send me midget menstural porn too. That bastards.
Ceci n'est pas une personne.

(no subject)

Brains! Must eat brains!!!!!

<td bgcolor="#000000">Zombie Name</td><td bgcolor="#DDDDAA"></td></tr><td bgcolor="#000000">You Will Become a Zombie Because</td><td bgcolor="#DDDDAA">You Never Saw it Comin, The Zombies Crowded Around and Started Nibblin' At your Toes </td></tr><td bgcolor="#000000">You Will Devour This Many People and Turn them Into Your Undead Army of Zombies</td><td bgcolor="#DDDDAA">292</td></tr><td bgcolor="#000000">You Are This Kind of Zombie</td><td bgcolor="#DDDDAA">Maniacal Killing Macine </td></tr><td bgcolor="#000000">Your Perfect Zombie Match Is</td><td bgcolor="#DDDDAA">Joe Strummer </td></tr><td bgcolor="#000000">You Will Be Destroyed In This Way, By</td><td bgcolor="#DDDDAA">Set on Fire while Lighting a Blunt </td></tr>
Zombies by surfsidesexx
Created with quill18's MemeGen!
Ceci n&#39;est pas une personne.

(no subject)

So, get all dolled up in my monkey suit and passed out my resume. Then I hit Powell's on the way home and got the new Terry Pratchett book Monstrous Regiment and Secret Portland Oregon: The Unique Guidebook To Portland's Hidden Sites, Sounds, & Tastes by Ann Carroll Burgess.

Already I have learned a couple things about Portland I didn't know. Such as some info on Portlandia. Portlandia is the statue gracing the front of the Portland Building (the one that looks like a very ornate Christmas package). Anyway, what the book has to say:

Portlandia is the second-largest hammered-copper statue in the world (the Statue of Liberty is the largest). In 1985, the citizenry came to cheer as the sculpture was barged down the Willamette River, hauled through downtown, and then lifted three stories to a ledge on the Portland Building (5th Avenue and Madison Street, Downtown). Why Portlandia? Why a scuplture of a woman? The art is based on Lady Commerce, a figure on the city's seal. Critics have called the work of scupltor Raymond Kaskey everything from brilliant to hideous. Go have a look at the kneeling giantess and draw your own conclusion.

Wow! The second largest? It's only 30 or 40 feet tall, or so it seems. I like the sculpture. It's has a very classical look, which goes well with the architecture of many of the old buildings in the area. But, what I find is odd that our city seal is Lady Commerce, and we have so many hippy, bohemians, and anarchists calling our fair city home. Perhaps we should have a chick dressed in hemp overalls and birkenstocks, smoking a joint, wearing a mohawk, and flipping the bird on our city seal? It would a much better match for the population of Portland.

The one thing I can't find in this book, The 24 Hour Church of Elvis. Does it still exist? Does anyone know where? If we could have found it skrape and I would have eloped. Don't worry sammay, it's not legal. Originally, you would put 50 cents into this parking meter they have, and then wear a sandwichboard with "Just Married" on it, and can's hanging off the back, and then walk up and down the street wearing that. You were "married" until time ran out on the meter. Great for telling stories about how you were "married". ;)

So, who want's to go get "married"? :-)
Ceci n&#39;est pas une personne.

(no subject)

Oh my god! I've found a resturant here in town that offers Fluffernutter Sandwiches. I had always assumed "Fluffernutter" was so slang for a blowjob or something. But no, its a sandwich with peanut butter and marshmellow fluff. I don't know if that sounds good or scary...
Ceci n&#39;est pas une personne.

(no subject)

While I am not religious, I have often found some of the most interesting art is generally religious in nature. They speak of belief, legends, lore, history, and faith. All powerful stuff. While on my journies around the world I have acquired some religious art from different cultures. But I never display them. It feels like I would be disrespecting other peoples faiths by using them for petty wall decorations.

What are your views on using religious icons for purely decorative reasons?

Like the rabbit I drew a few days ago and posted here. I felt kind of odd doing that, as it is copying a culture and possibly religion that I know relatively little of. And while I meant no disrespect to Native American culture by making that drawing, I could infact anger and upset many Native Americans if they knew I was subjigating thier cullture. Then again, they may not care. But I don't know.
Ceci n&#39;est pas une personne.

(no subject)

More useless Portland Trivia from my new book:

Portland, to state the obvious, is a city of bridges: 17, to be precise, including the worlds only telescoping double-deck vertical-lift bridge (Steel Bridge), the worlds oldest vertical-lift bridge (Hawthorne Bridge), and America's longest tied-arch bridge (Fremont Bridge). Goodness, who knew there were so many kinds! If you were to arrive in the city by boat, heading inland along the Willamette, you would encounter some of the city's most famous spans in the following order.

The St. Johns Bridge is named for the community at it's east end, which was originally named in honor of settler James John. John started a local ferry system near this spot with just one rowboat in 1852. Portland's only suspension bridge was designed by David B. Steinman, and the architect considered this Gothic-towered creation to be his masterpiece.

The Fremont Bridge, the newest to span the Willamette River, has the longest main span of any bridge in Oregon. The bridge was named in honor of John Charles Fremont, explorer and army officer. In 1842, Fremont was given federal funds to survey the Oregon Trail.

The Broadway Bridge, when it opened, was the largest double leaf drawbridge in the world. It's appellation reflects the street is carries. The city fathers spared no imagination in the naming of this viaduct.

The unique design of the Steel Bridge has never been duplicated. It features two decks, one for trains and one for automobiles, the lower of which can move independently of the other. Not only does this bridge accommodate wheeled vehicles it also obliges river traffic. The lower deck can raise 45 feet in just 10 seconds; the upper deck, 90 feet in 90 seconds. Talk about zero to 60! Before the mid-centurey decline in streetcar use, the upperdeck was for Portland's streetcars. In 1986, following an upgrade, the Steel Bridge became the cross-river link for Portland's MAX light-rail system.

The Burnside Bridge closes for a few hours each June to allow the Grand Floral Parade of the Portland Rose Festival to come across the river en route to downtown. The Morrison Bridge, part of the Willamette Light Brigade's project to light all of thedowntown bridges, was the first to be illuminated in 1987.

The Marquam Bridge holds the honor of being Portland's busiest span. It was the first double-deck automobile bridge to be built in the state. Built for utility rather than beauty, this connection closed the final gap in the California-Washington interstate highway system.

Only the interstate bridges cross the Columbia River.

So, I think I've now bored everyone to tears. I don't care though, I love little factoids. :-)