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Jun. 22nd, 2009 @ 10:55 am (no subject)
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Ceci n'est pas une personne.
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From:moonthink
Date:June 22nd, 2009 07:45 pm (UTC)
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Any electrical device (even a toothbrush or toaster!), especially one that broadcasts or receives signal - can interfere with the broadcasting or reception of any other signal.

Most electronics detail that fact in their fine print.

FCC regulations strive to minimize or prevent that from happening, though it still can and often does. Equipment manufactured for use in other countries and not specifically designed for use in the USA has a higher likelihood of causing interference.

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From:adameros
Date:June 22nd, 2009 08:06 pm (UTC)
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TYhat brings up one other question I've had for a while. The FCC requires that all electronics accept outside signals. Or at leas they used. I'm assuming it's so you can stop/jam/disrupt a device if needed, but damn.... I wish things were better sheilded so I could have my cell phone near things with speakers and not get that annoying noise.

Anyway, anyone know the real reason all electronics must accept outside signals?
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From:moonthink
Date:June 22nd, 2009 08:21 pm (UTC)
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I think the long short of it is the fact that if a devices is shielded against accepting signals, it is essentially considered a stealth/spy/terrorist device.